Translating Hairstylist Lingo – What Will My Hair Look Like If My Stylist Does That?

Good communication between you and your stylist will make both of you happier. You’ll have fewer bad hair days and she’ll have more satisfied clients. But not every hair stylist knows how to translate hairspeak into plain English (sorry, I can’t help you with other languages).
So, you must ask, ask and ask again for your hairstylist to explain what she’s doing to your hair, why she thinks it’s a good idea, and how you can recreate the look at home. To keep her from thinking you’re a total n00b, print this guide to hairspeak out and review it before you go into the hair salon.
When your hairstylist says she’d like to give you a style that’s:
CHOPPY
A choppy style has various lengths usually done with a razor.
Thick, straight hair cut short is the typical choppy hairstyle but mid-length hair can go choppy too. You’ll need regular trims since letting a choppy hairstyle grow out looks ragged. It’s a good way to cut back on the blow drier time for thick hair and gives you a young, fun look.
BEACHY
She means that wind-tousled, wavy look that swimmers or surfers (get it, beach dwellers?) may have.
If your hair has a bit of a natural wave and is reasonably thick, this fairly low maintenance look could work for you. You’ll let it dry without heat and apply a spray or gel.
It’s usually an above the shoulder hairstyle since it tends to just look messy with longer hair.
Products you’ll need:
oVolumizing spray
oStraightening balm (if you have thick, course hair)
oHair dryer
oA 1-inch barrel curling iron
oPonytail holder and bobby pins
oShine serum
oHairspray
oSaltwater spray
OVERDIRECTION
Isn’t a cut it’s a blowdrying technique.  By blowing out your hair to the opposite side and then flipping it over on the part side, you get more volume. At home, sitting down and flipping your hair over while drying some of the underside can get you this effect.
PIECEY
Another after effect. Your hairstylist will use wax or hair gel to stick the ends together and then use her fingers to break your hair up into 1-3 inch sections. It’s often used on a choppy short cut to create texture.
STRUCTURE
Here she’s talking about giving you a geometric cut like a bob. You’ll need the right size roller brush to recreate the smooth finish at home.
TEXTURIZING
Can be used on curly hair to make it smoother or on flat hair to make it look fuller! Texturizing curly hair involves cutting diagonally. and involves layers for naturally flat hair.
THINNING OUT
To remove some of the bulk from thick hair, a razor or thinning shears are used. Starting about an inch from the scalp and going to the ends. You usually have to ask for this and your stylist should refuse if you have fine, dry or damaged hair as it will produce massive frizzies.
GIVE YOUR HAIR MOVEMENT
When you stylist says she wants to give your hair some movement, she’s usually talking about adding layers to mid-length hair to make it lighter and allow it to swing and bounce. The layers shouldn’t start above your ears. This cut allows you to wear your hair down without it looking flat. If you tell your stylist you want to, she can start the layers low enough for you to pull your hair into a ponytail.
Got more hairspeak you want explained? Shoot me an email and I’ll write up another hairstylist lingo translation guide.

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